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Program in the Humanities

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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June 2014

FEATURED Training: The 2014 Local Government Seminar       

Date: July 28 & 29, 2014
Location: Wilmington, NC
Generously Supported by the North Carolina City and County Management Association

*Only a few spaces remain*

Every day, local government touches the lives of North Carolinians and provides the services essential for functional communities, growing businesses, and healthy families.  It is local government that supplies water to our faucets, collects our trash, moves traffic through our downtowns, and cuts the grass in our parks and ball fields.  It is also local government that delivers care and counseling to those facing difficult times and responds with qualified personnel to life’s emergencies.

Participants in this seminar will learn first-hand the role of local government in North Carolina and then explore pedagogical strategies for teaching young people about how local government in North Carolina works.  Highlights of the Seminar will include: meeting with elected and appointed local government officials and staff, “behind-the-scenes” field trips to various city and county facilities, and MUCH MORE!

Participants will receive:

  • Lesson plans aligned to the NC Essential Standards
  • 1.5 renewal credits
  • A FREE, single occupancy hotel room for the evening of July 28 (for participants residing more than 50 miles from the training location)
  • Meals – lunch and dinner on 7/28;  continental breakfast and lunch on 7/29; snacks throughout.
  • One-on-one access to various elected and unelected officials and city and county staff.
  • “Special Access” field trips to various sites around the city and county.

For additional details and registration information, click here.

FEATURED Resources: The Age of Enlightenment

Students will explore the Age of Enlightenment through a Power Point presentation and class discussion. Students will then further explore this period of history and its prominent figures by designing a dinner party for 12 Enlightenment thinkers. This project will encourage students to learn more about the period and the philosophers associated with it, as well as synthesize what they have learned while utilizing higher order thinking, group work skills, and creativity.

 News Updates

1. NC plan would join states ending teacher tenure

By EMERY P. DALESIO, Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. — North Carolina legislators want to scrap a law that prevents ineffective teachers from being removed from the classroom. But teachers have been fighting the move, saying they need protection from malicious schoolhouse politics.

A proposed state budget that gained Senate approval early Saturday would give raises averaging 11 percent to veteran teachers who give up tenure. Most of the $468 million needed to cover raises if all 57,000 tenured teachers took the deal would come from cutting other parts of the state’s public school budget.

North Carolina lawmakers voted last year to phase out tenure for teachers who have earned it by 2018. That bid was blocked by a Superior Court judge who ruled teachers couldn’t lose a right they’d earned.

So Senate leaders shifted to dangling a big raise next year to teachers who give up tenure voluntarily, a move other states haven’t tried, said Kathy Christie of the Denver-based Education Commission of the States.

“I don’t know of any other state that is broadly (offering) the raise based on whether they give up tenure,” said Christie, who tracks state education policies for the nonpartisan group funded by state governments.

Half the states set a minimum teaching salary or pay schedule, according to the National Council on Teacher Quality, a Washington, D.C. education reform group.

For more than 40 years, North Carolina law has said veteran teachers cannot be fired or demoted except for listed reasons that include poor performance, insubordination and immorality. Teachers earning career status after at least four years in a school district also can challenge their firing at a hearing and later in court.

Only Florida has succeeded in eliminating teacher tenure protections, according to the Education Commission of the States. Kansas lawmakers this spring stripped teachers of their tenure rights beginning this summer — though tenure can still be negotiated by local school districts. Idaho and South Dakota lawmakers tried to eliminate teacher protections but were reversed by voters in 2012 referendums.

Critics say teachers too often get tenure simply by continuing to show up for work and that bad teachers can be too expensive to fire.

The latest statistics from the National Center for Education Statistics, dating to the 2011-12 school year, show less than 1 percent of teachers dismissed both in North Carolina and across the country lost their jobs for poor performance, although the numbers vary widely by school district. The percentage of tenured teachers forced out for poor performance is much lower in North Carolina than nationwide, the survey by a division of the U.S. Department of Education found.

North Carolina is one of 29 states that specify that tenured teachers can be dismissed because they’re ineffective in the classroom, according to the National Council on Teacher Quality. But the state also is one of 38 where teachers have multiple opportunities to appeal their dismissal, the group said.

“In most states, those rights have made it very difficult to terminate a teacher,” said Sandi Jacobs, a council vice president who oversees state policies effecting educators.

At least one North Carolina court case supports arguments both that firing teachers can take years and that appeals are necessary to prevent good teachers from being railroaded.

The state Court of Appeals in December ruled that the Perquimans County school board fired teacher Vanessa Joyner in 2012 without clear cause. Joyner had earlier reported a school board member’s wife, who taught at the same school, for mistakes in administering a writing test, judges wrote in their ruling. Though the school district’s superintendent and her building’s principal recommended Joyner, the school board member described never-specified concerns about how she did her job, judges said. Claims that Joyner performed poorly were “essentially unsupported, undocumented hearsay presented by one biased member” of the school board, judges said.

Michael Albert, an English teacher at Grimsley High School in Greensboro, said he feels pretty confident as the school’s current teacher of the year about his job security. So Albert said he may give up his tenure protection, take a pay raise next year and look for a higher-paying job in another state like Indiana, where he estimates he could be paid about $11,000 a year more.

The job protections are important because with five different principals in his nine years at the school and a new principal coming next year, Albert said he’s not confident that his classroom performance can be fairly evaluated, meaning his job could be at risk in the future.

“I don’t have faith in the system they have in place for evaluating teacher effectiveness,” Albert said.

He cites low pay as the reason an ineffective teachers may linger in classrooms.

“We don’t get rid of them because we don’t have good teachers to take their place,” he said.

Science teacher Deanna Jones is ready to walk away from the tenure rights earned after 13 years in education. Private-sector jobs don’t have tenure protections and good teachers don’t need them, she said.

“I’ve always had excellent reviews and excellent evaluations and so I’ve not had to worry about losing my job I guess, knock on wood,” said Jones, who works at Mount Pleasant Middle School, about 30 miles east of Charlotte. “If you do your job and you don’t get into trouble like with the law or anything like that, you don’t have to worry about having tenure to back you up because you’re not going to get fired.”

This article originally appeared on WRAL.com on May 31, 2014.

2. Help Your Students Learn About Local Government with the ICMA’s Life, Well Run Campaign
Today, few people understand the critical role that professional local government management plays in creating communities that people are proud to call home.

A Harris Interactive poll found that while a third of citizens know that professional city managers oversee the day-to-day operations of their communities, only five percent can describe what a professional manager does or the important role he or she plays in shaping a community

In response, the International City/County Management Association (ICMA) has created the Life, Well Run campaign.  This is an opportunity to highlight the critical value that professional local government managers deliver to the communities we serve. It is designed to raise public awareness of how professional managers build effective local government and great communities. It also aims to inspire the next generation of professional local government managers.

As part of the Life, Well Run campaign the ICMA has produced a series of short video clips that are perfect for educators who teach about local government.  They can be used as warm up activities and/or as part of a lesson about the roles and responsibilities of professional managers.

For more information about the Life, Well Run campaign, click here.

To access the Life, Well Run videos (via their YouTube channel), click here.

3. The CEC is Now Taking Curriculum Requests!
Is there a particular topic for which you would like to request a lesson plan? The Consortium is working on adding to its Database of K-12 Resources and is taking requests! If there is a topic you find difficult to teach or make interesting for your students, or a topic for which you feel resources are lacking, let us know! Contact Christie Norris at cnorris@unc.edu and share details of what you’d like us to develop.

Current Opportunities

1. Hidden Histories: What your NC history Textbook Left Out
A professional development series to be held throughout the summer at the NC History Museum in Raleigh, NC
*All of the Hidden Histories workshops are currently full, but the wait list is still available.  To be added to the wait list, fax  your completed application to Paul Bonnici at 919.962.4318*

North Carolina’s K-12 teachers are invited to join the North Carolina Museum of History (ncmuseumofhistory.org) and the NC Civic Education Consortium (www.civics.org) for “Hidden Histories: What your NC history textbook left out,” an exciting professional development series designed to deepen educator knowledge of less known state and national history. Middle and high school teachers interested in gaining a more comprehensive and multi-didactic understanding of neglected people and events throughout history, in order to better engage their students’ interest and curiosity in our state and nation’s past, do not want to miss these three summer workshops!

Each two-day program will focus on a different time period and dynamically integrate:

  • Lectures from university scholars – As part of the agenda, teachers will be provided the opportunity to return to the role of students themselves as they expand their content knowledge in discussions and presentations from professors, authors, and scholars of North Carolina and American history.
  •  Interaction with the NC History Museum’s “The Story of North Carolina” exhibit – More than 14,000 years of the state’s history unfold through fascinating artifacts, multimedia presentations, dioramas, and hands-on interactive components throughout this exhibit.
  •  Pedagogical exploration – Teachers will explore how to use art, theatre and primary sources to actively engage students in social studies, as well as participate in parts of lesson plans designed by the CEC for the middle and high school classroom.
Workshop Topics & Dates
Teachers can sign up for one or more of the workshops within the Hidden Histories series. Further details are available in the registration form.
 
Colonization, Revolution and the New Nation – JUNE 26-27, 2014
  • Deadline for registration & cancellation: Friday, June 13
  • Sample sessions will include
    • A Parallel Struggle for Freedom: African Americans in the Revolutionary War, Dr. Reginald Hildebrand, UNC-Chapel Hill
    • Bloody North Carolina: Colonial Conflicts and Clashes, Dr. Wayne Lee, UNC-Chapel Hill
    • Native Ground: Indian Culture & the Impact of Colonization, Dr. Kathleen Duval, UNC-Chapel Hill
Civil War & Reconstruction – JULY 17-18, 2014
  • Deadline for registration & cancellation: Monday, July 7
  • Sample sessions will include
  • “As the War Turns” – Exploring the Drama of the Civil War, Dr. Margaret Humphries, Duke University
  • North Carolina’s Freed Black Communities, Dr. Freddie Parker, NC Central University
  • Quakers and the Underground Railroad in North Carolina, Dr. Gwen Ericson, Guilford College
Civil Rights in the Modern Century – AUGUST 7-8, 2014
  • Deadline for registration & cancellation: Friday, July 25
  • Sample sessions will include:
    • Against their Will: North Carolina’s Eugenics Program, Professor Alfred Brophy, UNC School of Law
    • §  Right to Ride: The Fight for Civil Rights in the Early 1900s, Dr. Blair Kelley, NC State University
    • North Carolina & Latino Immigration, Paul Cuadros, UNC-Chapel Hill
PARTICIPANTS WILL RECEIVE (for each individual workshop attended)
  • 1.5 Renewal Credits
  • Access to historical experts
  • Lesson plans and pedagogical training from the NC Civic Education Consortium
    • While lesson plans will be written with the middle and high school social studies classroom in mind, any interested educator who teaches the topics covered can attend, with the understanding that resources provided may need modified.
    • Special access to the exhibits and resources at the NC History Museum
    • Breakfast, lunch and snacks
    • Single occupancy hotel accommodations Thursday evening for participants residing more than 90 round-trip miles from the NC History Museum. Additionally, participants residing more than 375 round trip miles from the NC History Museum can request a Wednesday evening as well.

To register, download and complete the registration form here.

Special thanks to the William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trustfor providing the funding to make this series possible.

2. The 2014 Local Government Seminar       
Date: July 28 & 29, 2014
Location: Wilmington, NC
Generously Supported by the North Carolina City and County Management Association

Every day, local government touches the lives of North Carolinians and provides the services essential for functional communities, growing businesses, and healthy families.  It is local government that supplies water to our faucets, collects our trash, moves traffic through our downtowns, and cuts the grass in our parks and ball fields.  It is also local government that delivers care and counseling to those facing difficult times and responds with qualified personnel to life’s emergencies.

Participants in this seminar will learn first-hand the role of local government in North Carolina and then explore pedagogical strategies for teaching young people about how local government in North Carolina works.  Highlights of the Seminar will include: meeting with elected and appointed local government officials and staff, “behind-the-scenes” field trips to various city and county facilities, and MUCH MORE!

Participants will receive:

  • Lesson plans aligned to the NC Essential Standards
  • 1.5 renewal credits
  • A FREE, single occupancy hotel room for the evening of July 28 (for participants residing more than 50 miles from the training location)
  • Meals – lunch and dinner on 7/28;  continental breakfast and lunch on 7/29; snacks throughout.
  • One-on-one access to various elected and unelected officials and city and county staff.
  • “Special Access” field trips to various sites around the city and county.

For additional details and registration information, click here.

3. The Program in the Humanities and Human Values Announces the Summer 2014 “Adventures in Ideas” Seminars
Register now to secure a spot in a general seminar offered by the Program in the Humanities. Teachers receive a 50% discount off tuition and are entered in a drawing to receive a travel scholarship as a part of the Daisy Edmister Fund. Seminars are Friday evening and Saturday morning or all-day Saturday. Receive credit for 10 contact hours of continuing education. While these programs are designed for a general audience and do not include pedagogical training or lesson plans (unlike the Consortium’s teacher trainings, which include a combination of pedagogy, curriculum exploration and scholar lectures), these seminars are still an excellent way for teachers to expand their content knowledge in various topics.

Topics and dates are:

For more information about these opportunities and to register, visit, humanities.unc.edu or call 919-962-1544, or email human@unc.edu.

Register today to secure a seat!

4.  “Brother Can You Spare a Dime?  The 1930s in North Carolina”Online Teacher Workshops from the NC Museum of History
Dates: June 1 to July 15, 2014

What was life like for the average North Carolinian during the Great Depression?  Educators will explore this question using photographs, oral histories, and in-depth articles in order to discover the effect of the Great Depression on the state and its people.

Log on to the Internet for these distance-learning programs geared just for educators and earn continuing education credits (up to forty contact hours). Access the workshops anytime during the program dates. You must have access to a computer with an Internet connection to participate in these courses. The cost per workshop is $40, $35 for Associates. Each program is limited to thirty participants, so register early!

For more information, call 919-807-7965 or e-mail sally.bloom@ncdcr.gov.Online Workshop FAQs page is also available. To register for an online workshop, click here.

5. Duke Asian Pacific Study Institute’s Announces their Annual Summer Institute on East Asia
Dates for Elementary & Middle School Educators: Monday, July 21 – Tuesday, July 22
Dates for Middle & High School Educators: Monday, July 28 – Tuesday, July 29
Registration fee: $35

Participants must choose ONE workshop and commit to the full 2 days.

This year’s Summer Institute will explore environments in East Asia from a variety of perspectives, in ways that can be incorporated into many different grade levels and subject areas. “Environment” simply means everything that surrounds us in a given place or context, including natural, physical environments as well as cultural, historical environments. East Asia encompasses an incredible diversity of environments, in all senses of the term.

In these workshops, we’ll use framework of “Human and Natural Environments” to look at topics ranging from the role of the natural world in Miyazaki’s anime films to Chongqing’s development trajectory; from population and food security to natural themes in Chinese painting; from Buddhism in everyday life in Taipei to monsters and robots in Asian monster movies and what they say about urban growth. Presenters will be Duke faculty and other scholars and educators. (Specific topics will be different in each 2-day workshop, to be announced soon.) Each workshop will also include breakout sessions with other teachers to discuss strategies for integrating this material into your classrooms, as well as networking opportunities over lunch.

Open to K-12 educators in any job category (i.e., media specialists, curriculum coordinators, and administrators, as well as teachers) who teach in or support classroom environments in North Carolina. All participants who complete a workshop will receive a $100 stipend and can claim one unit of renewal credit. Participants who live outside the Triangle will be offered one night of lodging for the workshop.

Admission is on a rolling, first-come, first-served basis; enrollment is limited to 25 in each workshop. Each educator may register for only ONE of the workshops. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email and will be asked to pay a $35 registration fee to secure your spot. Participants who live outside the Triangle will be offered one night of lodging for the workshop. Once all spaces are filled, a waitlist will be created.

To register, visit: http://tinyurl.com/APSIsummer2014

Workshop descriptions will be available soon on our website: https://web.duke.edu/apsi/outreach/teacher.html

For more information, please contact Tanya Lee (tanya.lee@duke.edu; 919-668-2280).

6. North Carolina’s Role in the American Revolution

The North Carolina Society of the Cincinnati has produced a FREE, 20 minute video of North Carolina’s Role in the American Revolution. You may view it at the following link: http://ncsocietycincinnati.org/history/first-in-victory/ .

If you have links to videos that you think are valuable for teaching the Social Studies Essential Standards, please send an email to Dr. Steve Masyada at Stephen.Masyada@dpi.nc.gov.

7. NC Press Foundation’s Newspapers in Education Presents the “Dave Jones Award for the Advancement of Youth Readership”
Deadline: June 15, 2014

The Dave Jones award recognizes K-12 teachers and media specialists who are working to promote youth civic engagement through the use of news and newspapers that focus on local communities and/ or state. Specifically, the award will recognize educators who employ innovative lessons, units of study, educational programs or projects to develop students’ reading and writing skills and educate students about their community. These activities can take place in schools, homes and/or other settings where young people gather to learn, or the activities can be delivered using technology. The North Carolina Press Foundation’s Newspapers in Education Program sponsors the award.Award Specifications:

The winning educator will receive a $500 honorarium plus reimbursement of up to $750 for the following:

  • Registration fee to an educational conference chosen by the teacher or media specialist where she/he has a proposal accepted to present the lesson, unit, program or project chosen for the award.
  • Up to two nights in a hotel to attend the conference if the educator lives farther than 60 miles away and mileage • to and from the conference.
  • Payment for a substitute teacher.

The educator’s lesson, unit, program or project will be publicized in the North Carolina Press Association’s newsletter and through Newspaper in Education programs. The chosen lesson, unit, program or project also will be featured on the North Carolina Press Foundation’s website. Note: First and second alternates will be selected to accept the award if the winning teacher is unable to present his/her project at an educational conference.

Criteria for Selection:

  • The applicant must be a K-12 teacher or reading, media or instructional technology specialist in a North Carolina school.
  • The applicant must submit a lesson, unit, program or project that serves as a model for other educators and must be implemented during the 2013-2014 school year or as an ongoing effort.
  • The lesson, unit, program or project must include activities and strategies that advance reading and writing and civic learning and incorporate current events and news, particularly local and state news gathered through North Carolina newspapers, published in print and online.

More about Dave Jones:

Dave Jones spent his career with North Carolina newspapers. He worked for locally-owned newspapers, a weekly (The Enfield Progress), a small daily (The Wilson Daily Times) and large daily (The News & Observer) and served as an advertising sales representative, advertising director, general manager and adviser to newspaper publishers. He retired as associate publisher of The News & Observer. He served as president of the Journalism Foundation at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Journalism and Mass Communication and president of the North Carolina Press Foundation. During his career, Dave supported numerous educational efforts including the advancement of The Mini Page and Newspapers in Education.

To download the PDF version of the registration form, click here.  To download the Microsoft Word version of registration form, click here.

For more about Newspapers in Education, click here.

8. UNC J-school professor to join former President Carter for human rights discussion, screen documentary via free webcast

Friend of the CEC and UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication professor C.A. Tuggle will join former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and UNC Professor of Leadership and Public Policy Hodding Carter III for a panel discussion on human rights July 16 at 7 p.m. at The Carter Center in Atlanta.The event, which is part of the “Conversations at The Carter Center” series, will focus on Argentina’s “Dirty War” during which tens of thousands of individuals were arrested, tortured and killed from 1976-1983. Tuggle will screen his documentary – “Las Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo and the Search for Identity“ – which describes the efforts to track down the grandchildren missing as a result of the “war.”Tuggle will present the 45-minute documentary to begin the evening, and a discussion about human rights and featuring central figures in the film will follow. Jennifer McCoy, director of the Carter Center’s Americas Program, will moderate.Panelists include:

  • Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter
  • C.A. Tuggle, UNC professor and producer of “Las Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo and the Search for Identity”
  • Hodding Carter III, UNC professor and former U.S. assistant secretary of state for public affairs
  • Tex Harris, former U.S. Embassy officer in Argentina
  • Bob Cox, former editor of the English-language Buenos Aires Herald

The “Conversations at The Carter Center” series presents Carter Center experts, policy makers and special guests to discuss the issues that shape the world. Following discussions, panelists take questions from the audience.

All seats for this event have been reserved, but a live webcast will be available here and will be archived for future viewing. The webcast does not require registration.

The CEC has developed ready-to-implement curriculum about Argentina’s Dirty War for North Carolina Social Studies classrooms and a film viewing guide for general audiences:

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