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Program in the Humanities

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Adams Lecture

 

(c) photograph by Richard McAlpin

The Adams Lecture is named for E. Maynard Adams, who was Kenan Professor of Philosophy at UNC Chapel Hill. Professor Adams (1919-2003) played a key role in the creation of the UNC Humanities Program and was an eloquent spokesman for the role of the humanities and human values in contemporary education and culture. This annual lecture features outstanding faculty from the UNC College of Arts and Sciences.

Join us on Sunday, November 3, at 4 p.m. for the 2013 Adams Lecture with Professor H. Holden Thorp, newly appointed Provost of Washington University in St. Louis. Stay tuned for more details regarding the lecture.

Read the 2010 Adams Lecture featuring Professor Joseph M. Flora, Professor Emeritus, Department of English and Literature.

1998 – E. M. Adams, “An Economy Fit for Human Beings”

1999 - Gerhard Weinberg, “Peace, War, and the United States in the Twentieth Century”

2000 – William E. Leuchtenberg, “The American Presidency in the Twentieth Century”

2001 – Jack Sasson, “The Search for the Hebrew God”

2002 – Lilian Furst, “The Novel as Social History: Windows on the Past”

2003 - Weldon Thornton, “Are Our Universities Failing Their Intellectual Mission?”

2004 – Doris Betts, “Stories, Poems, and Superfluous Beauty”

2005 - Richard Soloway, “Perfecting the Imperfect: The Eugenic Foundations of Genetic Engineering”

2006 - George Lensing, “Poetry, Senator McCarthy, and Me”

2007 – Trudier Harris, “Failed, Forgotten, Forsaken:  Christianity in Contemporary African American Literature”

2008 - Richard Kohn, “On Presidential War Leadership, Then and Now”

2009 - Richard Talbert, “Rome and the Power of Creative Cartography: AD 300 – 1500″

2010 – Joseph M. Flora, “Professing the Humanities in a Post-Modern World”

2012 – Joy Kasson, “Dramas of History and Vision: Three Contemporary Artists and the Necessity of the Arts”

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