Loading Events

← Back to Events

Chapel Hill Campus

+ Google Map
Please Contact Humanities Program for exact location

Upcoming Events

Events List Navigation

October 2017

Sea Power and its Influence in Modern Warfare

October 13 @ 4:30 pm - October 14 @ 1:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Humanities Program for exact location + Google Map

The military significance of sea power evolved rapidly after modern navies changed from sailing ships to ships that were powered by steam and other fuels. This seminar will focus on the naval aspects of modern warfare, with particular attention to the changing ideas about sea power in the late 19th century, the battleship race of the early 20th century, the development of submarines, aircraft carriers and new naval strategies in the two world wars, and the new uses of naval…

Find out more »

Tradition and Resistance: Transitions in Indigenous Cultures – A Dialogues Seminar

October 21 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Humanities Program for exact location + Google Map

In collaboration with the Institute for the Study of the Americas Global economic and cultural changes have profoundly affected indigenous cultures throughout the Americas, but these changes have also given indigenous people new reasons to reaffirm their cultural identities as they resist globalizing social forces. In this dialogue seminar, Emilio del Valle Escalante will examine how Indians in Guatemala have defined and defended their cultural autonomy amid repressive outside interventions, and Benjamin Frey will explain how Cherokee communities in North…

Find out more »

In Times of War and Peace: American Musicals of the 1940s

October 28 @ 9:00 am - 4:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Humanities Program for exact location + Google Map

Tim Carter returns to the Adventures in Ideas stage with the second installment of his decade-by-decade examination of American Musicals. This fall he takes on the 1940s. Whether and how American musicals on stage or screen should respond to World War II was a matter of some debate at the time. Some argued in favor of morale-boosting propaganda, while others preferred escapist entertainment. But the return to peace forced dealing with new social realities, whether reintegrating the military into civilian…

Find out more »
November 2017

Representing the Sacred: World Religions and Artistic Expression

November 4 @ 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Humanities Program for exact location + Google Map

Religious imagery and iconography is as old as worship itself. This seminar will take an interdisciplinary and transcultural look at the roles art and architecture have played in religious practice over time and across the world. Jennifer Gates-Foster will explain how ancient Egyptian objects, as beautiful and appealing as they may be, were created to enhance cultic observances and rituals in Pharaonic Egypt. Glaire Anderson will examine medieval Islamic architecture and the ways these artistic edifices contributed to worship practices…

Find out more »

Sweatshops and Robots: Transitions in Global Labor

November 18 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Humanities Program for exact location + Google Map

In collaboration with the Global Studies Center Technological advancement and globalization are having a critical effect on employment and our global economy. Marshall Brain will discuss the effects of automation and intelligent machines as competitors with humans for employment in the labor marketplace. Peter Coclanis will explore the effects and future of global outsourcing of labor. TOPICS & SPEAKERS The Globalization of Labor: In Reverse or Full Speed Ahead? Peter Coclanis, Albert Ray Newsome Distinguished Professor of History and Director,…

Find out more »
December 2017

Italy: Then & Now – A Dialogues Seminar

December 2 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Humanities Program for exact location + Google Map

in Collaboration with the Center for European Studies From antiquity down to modern times the Italian peninsula has been the multicultural home for people who have spoken different languages, lived under different government systems and struggled with social fragmentation. Richard Talbert will discuss how the fragmented peoples of ancient Italy were gradually unified and dominated by the Roman Republic and Empire. Historian Tobias Hof will then examine how modern Italians continue to face fragmenting challenges as they struggle with Mediterranean…

Find out more »
+ Export Events