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  • Upon completion of a module, e-mail CarolinaK12@unc.edu with the required information and receive a CEU certificate for the designated increment.
  • Need a larger CEU increment on one form? You can combine more than one program and request they be combined onto one certificate.
  • Questions can be sent to CarolinaK12@unc.edu. Happy teaching & learning!

Wilmington 1898: The Hidden History of An American Coup D’État – .6 CEUs

On November 10, 1898, the only successful coup d’état ever to take place on American soil began with the torching of a black owned newspaper in Wilmington, North Carolina, and ended with white supremacists overthrowing the local government. The coup was the culmination of a white supremacy and propaganda campaign waged all across the state, designed to strip black men of the right to vote, remove them from public office, and stoke fear. Throughout the events of 1898 and after, at least 60 (and possibly hundreds) of black men were murdered, and more than 2,100 African Americans were banished or fled the city, turning a black-majority town known as a symbol of black hope and progress, into a stronghold of white supremacy. In this session, three award-winning historians, authors and experts on this period – LeRae Umfleet, David Cecelski, and Dr. Freddie Parker – discuss the events leading up to and taking place during the Wilmington coup, as well as discuss the lasting legacy of this little known history. After a brief presentation from each panelist, they answer and discuss questions posed by attending educators. During the second half of the session professors of education Lisa Brown Buchanan (Elon University) and Cara Ward (UNC-W), as well as middle school teacher Cori Greer-Banks, discuss strategies for teaching 1898 Wilmington, teaching “hard history” in general, as well as the challenges teachers often face in this work.

TO RECEIVE .6 CEUs:

Additional resources that were mentioned/shared throughout the 1898 Wilmington event can be found here.

A recording of a discussion with the director and several actors from the film The Red Cape, a dramatization about Wilmington 1898, is also available here.


Rifles, Radio & Resistance: Robert F. Williams & the Black Freedom Movement

While our history books usually include a watered-down version of the American Civil Rights Movement and its use of non-violent direct action, little attention is paid to the courageous resistance to white supremacy enacted by men such as North Carolina’s Robert F. Williams. The defiance of Mr. Williams and thousands of other activists, including the partnership of his wife Mabel, illustrates how black Southerners were prepared to defend themselves, their families, their homes, and their rights however necessary – including armed self-defense. In this session, we will examine the influences, philosophies, leadership, and action of Robert F. Williams, which as written by Dr. Tim Tyson, “illustrates that ‘the civil rights movement’ and ‘the Black Power movement’ emerged from the same soil, confronted the same predicaments, and reflected the same quest for African American freedom.

TO RECEIVE .6 CEUs:

Additional resources that were mentioned/shared throughout the Robert Williams program can be found here.


More Than a Mill Worker: Ella May & the Loray Mill Strike

Ella May (also known by her married name, Ella May-Wiggins) was part of a generation of hopeful Appalachians who left the mountains for the North Carolina mills in search of a better life. Yet, despite her persistence, fortitude and strong work ethic, she struggled to provide for herself and her family due to low wages, long hours, and excruciating working conditions. By 1929, twenty-eight-year-old Ella was a single mother who had lost four of her nine children to poverty. After settling in a predominately African American community called Stumptown in Gaston County, and working seventy-two hours a week on the night shift at American Mill No. 2 in Bessemer City, Ella turned to the National Textile Workers’ Union, who were organizing a strike at the nearby Loray Mill, as her last hope for survival.

This program discusses the tenacious life of Ella May, the conditions she fought against, and her subsequent murder at only age 29 for organizing Black and white millworkers in fighting for a 40-hour week and living wages. We will also discuss the role Ella’s music played in the resistance (and hear a few of her ballads), as well as North Carolina’s long history of complicated labor laws and anti-unionization.

TO RECEIVE .3 CEUs:

  • READ: The Loray Mill Strike in Gastonia and Mill Mother’s Lament: Ella May Wiggins and the Gastonia Textile Strike of 1929.(Teachers can contact CarolinaK12@unc.edu for a copy of this article if needed.)
  • VIEW our recorded program on Ella May & the Loray Mill Strike here
  • REVIEW Carolina K-12’s Tips for Tackling Sensitive History/Controversy in the Classroom. Remember, preparation is key to teaching potentially controversial themes (which can include union and labor history.)
  • TEACH about Ella May using this lesson plan or other resources you find/create: Ella May & the Loray Mill Strike
  • WRITE: After completing these steps, to receive .3 CEUs, e-mail CarolinaK12@unc.edu with the following information:
    • In the subject line write: CEU Request
    • Include your name, grade/subject taught, and school at which you teach.
    • Include the name of the module you completed (Ella May)
    • Include the date you viewed the program recording and the date you implemented a teaching activity
    • Write at least one paragraph about what you learned and how you used and/or revised this material in your classroom, including what worked well and the impact it had on students, as well as what you might change in the future (if anything)

Additional resources on Ella May & the Loray Mill Strike can be found here.


 Jim Crow in North Carolina – .5 CEUs

Jim Crow was a system of racial apartheid in the American South that lasted for nearly one hundred years, affecting every part of Southern life, from racial segregation to social etiquette. The system had many features, but its primary function was to promote and maintain a white supremacist racial order, the remnants of which are still shape our present. This program explores the history of Jim Crow in North Carolina through a conversation with historian and legal scholar Richard Paschal, author of the new book Jim Crow in North Carolina: The Legislative Program from 1865 to 1920. (Live participants also enjoyed a performance of the musical “The Movement,” a historical acapella that chronicles the fight against Jim Crow that took place in the Children’s March of 1963. While this recording does not include the performance, it does include a conversation with the show’s creator.) The program ends with an overview of the newly launched website, On the Books, a project of UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries that provides the first-ever catalogue of searchable Jim Crow laws for the entire state of North Carolina – https://onthebooks.lib.unc.edu/. Accompanying lesson plans & resources are available under the TEACH tab of the site.

TO RECEIVE .5 CEUs:

  • READ: Jim Crow is Still Alive in NC (which discusses Richard Paschal’s book) and https://onthebooks.lib.unc.edu/laws/the-laws-in-context/ (which provides and overview of the On the Books site.)
  • VIEW the recorded program, Jim Crow in North Carolina. The first hour contains an interview with author Richard Paschal; the final 30 minutes contains an overview of the website On the Books.
  • BROWSE the website On the Books.
  • REVIEW Carolina K-12’s Tips for Tackling Sensitive History/Controversy in the Classroom. Remember, preparation is key to teaching themes such as this successfully.
  • TEACH at least one lesson from the TEACH tab to utilize (or modify and utilize) with your students. (***The overview lesson for the site is similarly titled Jim Crow in North Carolina.)
  • WRITE: After completing these steps, to receive .5 CEUs, e-mail CarolinaK12@unc.edu with the following information:
    • In the subject line write: CEU Request
    • Include your name, grade/subject taught, and school at which you teach.
    • Include the name of the module you completed (Jim Crow in North Carolina)
    • Include the date you viewed the program recording and the date you implemented a teaching activity
    • Write one paragraph about how you used and/or revised this material in your classroom, including what worked well and the impact it had on students, as well as what you might change in the future (if anything)

Additional resources that were mentioned/shared throughout the live event can be found here.


“The Light of Truth”: Teaching and Learning About Ida B. Wells – .5 CEUs

Anti-lynching activist Ida B. Wells-Barnett believed that “The way to right wrongs is to turn the light of truth upon them.” These programs explore the incredible work of Ida B. Wells, and how to teach comprehensively about our shared “hard history” to ensure students understand the implications of our past and are empowered to address the challenges of the present. From integrating primary sources to focusing on resistance in the stories we elevate, explore ideas, strategies, and specific lesson plans for teaching about Ida B. Wells-Barnett, racial terror lynching, the lasting legacies of racial violence, and more.

TO RECEIVE .5 CEUs:

  • REVIEW Carolina K-12’s lesson plan, Ida B. Wells & her Light of Truth. If you are unfamiliar with Wells, the materials in the lesson plan can provide a good overview.
  • VIEW this 1 hour session on the history of racial terror and lynching, followed by  this 1.30 pedagogical session about teaching these topics/themes.
  • REVIEW Carolina K-12’s Tips for Tackling Sensitive History/Controversy in the Classroom. Remember, preparation is key to teaching themes such as this successfully.
  • TEACH about Ida B. Wells in your classroom and/or related themes. (Use/modify this lesson or create your own about Ida B. Wells, or use these lessons to explore racial terror lynching in the classroom.)
  • WRITE:  After completing these steps, to receive .5 CEUs, e-mail CarolinaK12@unc.edu with the following information:
    • In the subject line write: CEU Request
    • Include your name, grade/subject taught, and school at which you teach.
    • Include the name of the module you completed (Ida B. Wells)
    • Include the date you viewed the program recording and the date you implemented a teaching activity
    • Write one paragraph about how you used and/or revised this material in your classroom, including what worked well and the impact it had on students, as well as what you might change in the future (if anything)

Additional resources that were mentioned/shared throughout the live event can be found here.