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Chapel Hill Campus

Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location
919.962.1544

January 2017

Japan: Then & Now – A Dialogues Seminar

January 28, 2017 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

In collaboration with the Carolina Asia Center, Historians Morgan Pitelka and David Ambaras consider Japan’s complex relations with China, Korea, and others in the Asia-Pacific in the sixteenth century and twentieth centuries.  In particular, they will discuss wars and trade and the changing social relations that shaped these conflicts.  The seminar will conclude with a panel discussion with both of our scholars reflecting on ways that Japan has changed over this time period, and how the legacy of those evolutions is visible in Japan today. Topics…

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February 2017

What’s New in the Middle Ages?

February 11, 2017 @ 9:15 am - 5:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

The Medieval period of European history has been mischaracterized as an age of little innovation, while scholars who study the period are often portrayed as antiquarians poring over old texts without recourse to new research methods, tools, and perspectives.  This seminar will put these notions to rest by showing how novel approaches to scholarship of the Medieval Era are yielding new insights on the era and on our world today. Join art historian Caroline Bruzelius, religious studies scholar Jessica Boon,…

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Rethinking Modernity: Europe and the World from the Renaissance to the Crisis of the 21st Century

February 17, 2017 @ 4:30 pm - February 18, 2017 @ 1:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

Most narratives of Western history have long argued that Europeans and Americans achieved unprecedented human progress by creating the key institutions and values of modernity: global trading systems, democratic national states, advanced science and technology, religious tolerance, and the legal equality of citizens. These themes shaped the meaning of “modernization” after 1945, yet recent events suggest that modern people are unhappy and that modern institutions are now mired in a transitional crisis. Professors John Jeffries Martin and Lloyd Kramer will…

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March 2017

America’s World War I: From Isolation to Engagement and Back Again

March 4, 2017 @ 9:15 am - 4:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Gerhard L. Weinberg  2017 marks the one-hundredth anniversary of America’s entry in the greatest world conflict up that that point, World War I. Join distinguished scholar Gerhard Weinberg, whose Adventures in Ideas seminars on World War II have long been among our most popular, as he steps back one generation to cover the conflict that was once known as “The Great War,” and discusses the importance and legacy of the United States’ first intervention in…

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May 2017

2017 Uhlman Family Seminar: Jewish Song, Comedy, and Storytelling in the Old and New Worlds

May 6, 2017 @ 9:15 am - 5:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

This year’s annual Uhlman Seminar will focus on Jewish culture as revealed through entertainment: music, film, folklore, humor, and the storytelling components present in all of these arts. Ruth von Bernuth will open the seminar by establishing a foundation of Jewish folklore and storytelling, and Jane Peppler will tell us about her experience resurrecting the wry, satirical, cosmopolitan songs of Warsaw’s cabaret scene that were lost after the Holocaust. Next we’ll enjoy a special lunchtime performance of North Carolina-based klezmer…

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June 2017

Air Power & Civilian Casualties from World War I to the Atomic Bomb

June 10, 2017 @ 9:00 am - 4:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map
Gerhard Weinberg

A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Gerhard L. Weinberg  Civilian casualties have always been a feature of war, but nothing in history compared to the devastation inflicted upon noncombatants during the two World Wars of the twentieth century.  With the introduction of air power, new strategic thinking about valid targets of military action put civilians in danger as collateral damage of bombings aimed at economic assets, or directly in the crosshairs as the intentional victims of attacks on “enemy morale.”  Join…

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Impact of World War I: Culture, Cinema, and Colonies

June 17, 2017 @ 10:30 am - 4:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Continuing our exploration of the significance and meaning of the First World War, this seminar focuses specifically on the war’s enormous cultural influence.  We’ll move beyond the war’s military and diplomatic dimensions to examine how writers, artists, filmmakers, and colonized people both inside and outside of Europe responded to the disorienting upheavals of the Great War. How did the war provoke creative people to reinterpret intellectual traditions, develop new cinematic images, and challenge European colonialism? This seminar seeks to answer…

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Contemporary Transformation of World Politics

June 24, 2017 @ 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

2016 was a year of incredible change in the United States and around the world. This seminar will explore how new political realities are influencing elections, domestic and foreign policy, and trade, and how governments and people are responding to them. From the populism that influenced “Brexit” and the 2016 US presidential election, to the increased visibility of Russia on the world stage and protest movements in the United States, there is a sense that politics are increasingly unpredictable and…

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September 2017

The Triumph of Christianity in the Ancient World

September 15, 2017 @ 4:30 pm - September 16, 2017 @ 12:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

*SOLD OUT* To be added to the waitlist, please send an email to human@unc.edu  with your name, number of seats requested, and contact information. The size of the waitlist will also determine if this program is repeated. A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Bart Ehrman  Bart Ehrman returns to the Adventures in Ideas stage this fall to celebrate the publication of his newest work, The Triumph of Christianity: How a Small Band of Outcasts Conquered an Empire. The Christian movement began with a small…

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October 2017

Sea Power and its Influence in Modern Warfare

October 13, 2017 @ 4:30 pm - October 14, 2017 @ 1:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

The military significance of sea power evolved rapidly after modern navies changed from sailing ships to ships that were powered by steam and other fuels. This seminar will focus on the naval aspects of modern warfare, with particular attention to the changing ideas about sea power in the late 19th century, the battleship race of the early 20th century, the development of submarines, aircraft carriers and new naval strategies in the two world wars, and the new uses of naval…

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*Cancelled* Tradition and Resistance: Transitions in Indigenous Cultures – A Dialogues Seminar

October 21, 2017 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

*Unfortunately, due to unforeseen circumstances, this Dialogue Seminar has been cancelled*   In collaboration with the Institute for the Study of the Americas Global economic and cultural changes have profoundly affected indigenous cultures throughout the Americas, but these changes have also given indigenous people new reasons to reaffirm their cultural identities as they resist globalizing social forces. In this dialogue seminar, Emilio del Valle Escalante will examine how Indians in Guatemala have defined and defended their cultural autonomy amid repressive…

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In Times of War and Peace: American Musicals of the 1940s

October 28, 2017 @ 9:00 am - 4:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Tim Carter returns to the Adventures in Ideas stage with the second installment of his decade-by-decade examination of American Musicals. This fall he takes on the 1940s. Whether and how American musicals on stage or screen should respond to World War II was a matter of some debate at the time. Some argued in favor of morale-boosting propaganda, while others preferred escapist entertainment. But the return to peace forced dealing with new social realities, whether reintegrating the military into civilian…

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November 2017

Representing the Sacred: World Religions and Artistic Expression

November 4, 2017 @ 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Religious imagery and iconography is as old as worship itself. This seminar will take an interdisciplinary and transcultural look at the roles art and architecture have played in religious practice over time and across the world. Jennifer Gates-Foster will explain how ancient Egyptian objects, as beautiful and appealing as they may be, were created to enhance cultic observances and rituals in Pharaonic Egypt. Glaire Anderson will examine medieval Islamic architecture and the ways these artistic edifices contributed to worship practices…

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December 2017

Italy: Then & Now – A Dialogues Seminar

December 2, 2017 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

in Collaboration with the Center for European Studies From antiquity down to modern times the Italian peninsula has been the multicultural home for people who have spoken different languages, lived under different government systems and struggled with social fragmentation. Richard Talbert will discuss how the fragmented peoples of ancient Italy were gradually unified and dominated by the Roman Republic and Empire. Historian Tobias Hof will then examine how modern Italians continue to face fragmenting challenges as they struggle with Mediterranean…

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February 2018

The Triumph of Christianity in the Ancient World An Encore Presentation *Sold Out*

February 2, 2018 @ 4:30 pm - February 3, 2018 @ 12:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map
Bart Ehrman

This event is currently sold out. To be added to the waitlist, send an email with your name, number of tickets requested and preferred contact info to human@unc.edu or call us at 919.962.1544 A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Bart Ehrman  Bart Ehrman returns to Adventures in Ideas with an encore presentation of 2017’s seminar based on his upcoming work, The Triumph of Christianity: How a Small Band of Outcasts Conquered an Empire. If you missed it in September, now’s your…

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UNC and State Politics: Then and Now – A Dialogues Seminar

February 17, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Contentious issues have long forced the University of North Carolina to navigate between the state’s political leaders and the diverse ideas and actions of its students and faculty. Are recent controversies such as the debates over HB2, Confederate monuments or public funding a continuation of traditional tensions or a new more politicized stage in the University’s interactions with state authorities? This Dialogues seminar will explore this question with examples from the University’s history and evolving position within North Carolina’s political…

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Shakespeare: New Perspectives

February 24, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 4:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Mary Floyd-Wilson Shakespeare is, of course, great writing, but it’s even better when performed by expert actors. Likewise, there is great scholarship on Shakespeare, but it’s even better when presented to the public by an expert lecturer! Carolina has such a scholar in Mary Floyd-Wilson, who offers new insights on two of the Bard’s most-beloved plays. Critics believe William Shakespeare wrote the comedy Twelfth Night and the tragedy Hamlet in 1601, the same year his…

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March 2018

Spain: Then & Now – A Dialogues Seminar

March 3, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Spain has long been a land of beauty and culture. Her influence is still felt the world over. Two excellent scholars, Flora Cassen and Sam Amago, will help us compare the past and present of this remarkable country, reviewing its difficult history from the era of its once powerful empire to the present, with particular attention to its diverse cultures, contested spaces, and conflicting religions and regions. TOPICS & SPEAKERS Spain Then: Empire and Expulsion Flora Cassen, Associate Professor of…

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Learning from the Holocaust: Public Monuments, Museums, and Memory

March 24, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

The Uhlman Family Seminar, in collaboration with the Center for Jewish Studies Recent controversies over monuments featuring leaders and soldiers of the Confederacy in the American Civil War have sparked heated debates—and violent acts—over what to publicly commemorate and how to do it. Many suggest that honoring the victims of historic catastrophes would provide more resolution and healing for communities than celebrating the actors that perpetrated them. This seminar explores how memorialization in art and public spaces in Europe and…

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April 2018

The French Revolution: Politics, Violence, and Polarization

April 7, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Political polarizations divide Left and Right wing groups in all modern, democratic societies, but similar, emotion-charged political conflicts were already present during and after France’s great Revolution of 1789. What caused this famous Revolution, how did it affect the lives of those who lived through it or remembered it, how did it divide later French politics into “Left” and “Right” factions, and how have creative filmmakers interpreted the Revolution in modern movies? Join the lively “intellectual team” from Carolina Public…

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Whatever Happened to Global Diplomacy?

April 20, 2018 @ 4:30 pm - April 21, 2018 @ 1:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

In honor of Professor Michael Hunt Older systems and methods of international diplomacy are giving way to a growing populist disdain for careful diplomatic negotiations. Complex problems are often reduced to superficial statements in the mass media or to simple tweets that ignore the history of past events. What has happened to the traditions of global diplomacy? This seminar will examine this question through the perspectives of leading historians and public policy scholars who will analyze past diplomatic strategies as…

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Paris: Then & Now – A Dialogues Seminar

April 28, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Paris has been a center of cultural and social innovation throughout the modern era, and it remains an influential trendsetter in the contemporary world. Why was Paris so influential in the 19th century, and how does it exemplify the transitions that are now taking place in the world’s largest cities? This Dialogues seminar will focus on two important periods of Parisian history and suggest why and how the “City of Lights” helps us understand key issues in modern urban cultures.…

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May 2018

Germany Under the Nazis

May 4, 2018 @ 4:30 pm - May 5, 2018 @ 1:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

The Nazi seizure of power in Germany led to a global war that affected people throughout the world, but the Nazis also profoundly transformed political and social life within Germany itself through the repressive policies of their totalitarian regime (1933-1945). This seminar features two distinguished historians who will discuss how Hitler’s governing system controlled German society and how Nazi ideas and laws affected families and women—including the more than one million women who served in the German military during World…

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June 2018

Great Cities: Tokyo and Hong Kong

June 2, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Our first Dialogues seminar this summer will connect two great Asian cities: Tokyo and Hong Kong. As the early modern capital of the Tokugawa Shogunate, the city of Edo grew from a small rural town to the largest city in the world and became known as Tokyo. The British colony of Hong Kong evolved from a small Chinese island into a global center of trade and finance before returning to Chinese control at the end of the 20th century. How…

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Germany in Transition: Politics and Culture

June 23, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Since the Syrian refugee crisis of 2016, Germany has played an important role in Europe’s attempts to grapple with populations fleeing international conflict. Some view Germany as one of the more welcoming places in Europe, perhaps because many Germans want to atone for historical crimes. Others worry about the rising popularity of right-wing populism and the violent attacks that have been directed at refugees. How is Germany changing? Is a resurgent German nationalism reshaping German culture and politics? This Dialogue will…

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September 2018

World War II in the Pacific

September 8, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 4:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

*Sold Out: Email human@unc.edu to be added to the waitlist* A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Gerhard Weinberg The Second World War was a vast global conflict, but the war in the Pacific often receives less historical attention than the famous, horrific events in Europe. In this seminar, distinguished historian Gerhard Weinberg will examine the specific causes of the Pacific war, the main strategic components of both the Japanese and American military campaigns, and the reasons for the ultimate American victory.…

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Power and Ambition: Political Family Dynasties Through the Ages

September 21, 2018 @ 4:30 pm - September 22, 2018 @ 1:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Families are time-honored sources of virtues and values. But what if a family’s greatest virtue is its thirst for power? This seminar will examine five families whose members obtained positions at the highest levels of society: the Medicis, Tudors, and Bonapartes in Europe, and the Kennedys and Clintons in the United States. Though they lived in different eras with unique histories, each family had a reputation to uphold while balancing the deeds of capable members with the embarrassments of their…

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The World of Tomorrow: Benefits, Risks, and Challenges

September 29, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Our society is experiencing fundamental transformations that affect nearly every aspect of our lives. New technologies and methods in communications, medicine, environmental engineering, robotics, and other spheres of innovation promise great benefits but also pose challenges to traditional ideas about our health, privacy, work, and daily life. This seminar will explore advances in genetics, robotics, and city planning to paint a picture of the future–with all of its promise and potential challenges. TOPICS & SPEAKERS The Wild West of Genetic…

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October 2018

1968: A Global Revolution That Changed the World

October 6, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of 1968, a year of turmoil, violence, and social change whose legacies still inform our contemporary cultures and lives. What happened in 1968? Why was it a global phenomenon? How are the events of that pivotal year remembered, and what do they mean? This seminar will look broadly at 1968, revealing shared themes that shaped the famous protests of that year and crossed national boundaries, giving voice to women, inspiring musicians and composers to…

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Changes and Continuities in Modern Russian Culture

October 12, 2018 @ 4:30 pm - October 13, 2018 @ 1:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Modern Russian culture has both fascinated and baffled Americans who want to understand the complex history of this vast, constantly evolving nation.This seminar will explore the cultural and social dimensions of modern Russia, with particular attention to its creative films and literary legacy and the social experiences of its most recent generations.What makes Russian culture and society both distinctive and representative of the wider currents of modernity? We’ll look for answers to this question with the insights of four outstanding…

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Syria in Transition

October 20, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map
$65

In collaboration with the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations The Civil War in Syria is one of the most complex conflicts in the Middle East, and few outsiders understand its origins or its wide-ranging effects on the people who live there. This special Dialogues seminar will examine the historical causes of the devastating Syrian violence and give particular attention to the plight of refugees who have fled the country or struggled with the…

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Beyond Gatsby and Bathtub Gin: Rethinking the “Roaring ‘20s”

October 27, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

The 1920s are known as the age of flappers, speakeasys, and the new carefree lifestyles of America’s upper classes, but other cultural changes, especially the creative contributions of African-Americans, are often overshadowed. This seminar offers a more nuanced and complicated picture of the era by examining the harsh economic conditions beneath the veneer of prosperity and exploring how African-Americans helped usher in wider American art forms while also developing an empowering aesthetic of their own. TOPICS & SPEAKERS The Not-So-Roaring…

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November 2018

Bodies in Motion: Learning and Growing Through Human Movement *Cancelled*

November 3, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map
$65

**Due to unforeseen circumstances, this event has been cancelled** This Dialogues seminar looks at physical movement as a mode of artistic expression, learning, and self-improvement. From dance to informal “parkour,” or the art of moving through our environment, the human body is capable of extraordinary feats of dexterity and strength and demonstrations of beauty. Participants will be introduced to interdisciplinary dance to see how visual and physical learning can be applied to many problems.We will then discuss the history of…

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Korean War Legacies in the US & Asia

November 10, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

In collaboration with the Carolina Asia Center The Korean War is sometimes called the Forgotten War, but its legacy continues down to the present, influencing current events and political memories in both Asia and America. How do contemporary perceptions of recent conflicts in Korea reflect the contrasting ways in which the Chinese, Koreans, and Americans remember the Korean War? This seminar will focus on the Korean War’s enduring influence in China and Korea, as well as its effects on American war…

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December 2018

The Global Crisis of Liberal Democracies

December 1, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

In collaboration with the Institute for the Study of the Americas Democratic governments may now be facing more social unrest and populist opposition than at any time since World War II. Political elites are widely condemned as “out of touch” with the problems of ordinary people, unable to solve the economic challenges of globalization, and unresponsive to public concerns. Popular nationalist movements and new social media are disrupting the traditional processes of democratic institutions. Has liberal democracy fallen into a…

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January 2019

Cities of European Art: Florence and Paris

January 26, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

In collaboration with the Center for European Studies Creative artwork emerges in every human culture and historical era, but certain places have become especially influential centers of artistic work. This Dialogues seminar will focus on the influential development of new artwork and artistic institutions in two of the most important centers of European art: Florence and Paris. Two art historians will analyze the distinctive artistic creativity in these cities and note how the early modern cultural context influenced the lives…

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February 2019

Four Great Controversies in Early Christianity

February 1, 2019 @ 4:30 pm - February 2, 2019 @ 12:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

*Sold Out: Email human@unc.edu with your name, number of seats requested, and a phone number to be added to the wait list.* A Distinguished Scholar Seminar Featuring Bart D. Ehrman The growth of the Christian church from being a tiny sect of Jesus’ close followers to becoming a major world religion was not smooth and seamless. Christians faced controversy on every front—externally with both pagans and Jews and internally with various Christian groups holding diverse theological views struggling for dominance.…

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How Long Can a Truth Be Denied? The Life, Ideas, and Memory of Galileo

February 16, 2019 @ 9:15 am - 4:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

In collaboration with PlayMakers Repertory Company The Italian scientist Galileo Galilei was condemned by the Roman Catholic Church in the 17th century when he asserted that the earth was not the center of the universe. The German playwright Bertolt Brecht, who saw Galileo’s story as part of an enduring struggle between dogmatic faith and scientific reason, transformed this cultural clash into Life of Galileo (1938)—which PlayMakers Repertory Theater will present as a musical drama in March 2019. This seminar will…

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Art Beyond Hostilities: Music and Film in Israel/Palestine

February 23, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

In collaboration with the Center for Middle East and Islamic Studies at UNC-CH Due to an unforeseen family emergency, Dr. Professor Yaron Shemer has had to drop out of this seminar and will be unable to present his scheduled talk, "Israeli-Palestinian Collaborations in Cinema: Partnerships and Power Disparities." Dr. Michel Figueroa has graciously agreed to present two talks. Rather than Dr. Shemer's scheduled presentation on Israeli-Palestinian Collaborations in Cinema, Dr. Figueroa will present:  "The Art of Conflict" : During the…

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March 2019

Re-Reading The Catcher in the Rye: A Mental Health Perspective

March 2, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

J.D. Salinger’s novel The Catcher in the Rye (1951) introduced America to Holden Caulfield, the cynical teen, a character type common in literature and film ever since. Half lecture, half book discussion, this seminar will examine the American literary classic with the insights of professionals in the fields of psychology and psychiatry. Drawing on recent research in psychology, neuroscience, and adolescent mental health, the discussion will focus on issues such as self-perception, the desire for popularity, and Salinger’s own mental…

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Anxious Eras: Conflicts and Creativity in Uncertain Times

March 29, 2019 @ 4:30 pm - March 30, 2019 @ 1:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

Feeling uneasy lately? It may comfort you to know that people in the past have also suffered through periods of deep personal and collective anxiety—and managed to survive them. In fact, they often responded creatively to challenging circumstances, developing new ideas to under- stand and confront the problems of their time.This seminar begins with a review of Classical Greek playwrights and their depictions of a society under stress, noting how social tensions worked as a dramatic device. We’ll then turn…

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April 2019

The Versailles Treaty and Its Legacies

April 6, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

The enormous human and financial costs of the First World War created the emotionally charged context for the 1919 Versailles peace conference. The victorious Allies wanted to hold their enemies responsible for the conflict, but they also sought to create a “world safe for democracy.” These divergent aims led to recriminations, unfulfilled promises, and anger. Recognizing the complex legacy of the Versailles Treaty on its 100th anniversary, this seminar will explore how the peace treaty reshaped national politics in postwar…

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Cities of Cinema: Hollywood and Bollywood

April 27, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

Located on opposite sides of the globe, the cities of Los Angeles and Mumbai are homes to thriving international film industries known as Hollywood and Bollywood. This Dialogues seminar will compare and contrast these two industries and the cinematic traditions that have grown out of each. What has been the economic and cultural impact of these industries on their home countries, and how have their exported films influenced cultures all around the world? We’ll explore the types of films produced…

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May 2019

*Sold Out* The Battle of Normandy and the End of World War II: Reflections on the 75th Anniversary of D-Day

May 4, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 4:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location

*Sold Out: Email human@unc.edu with your name, number of seats requested, and a phone number to be added to the wait list.* A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Gerhard Weinberg The D-Day landings on the Normandy Beaches on June 6, 1944, marked a turning point in World War II, yet the meaning of this event was shaped by other strategic actions before and after the D-Day assault.This seminar, which comes on the eve of the D-Day anniversary of the Normandy campaign,…

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June 2019

What If? Learning from Reimagined Pasts in Science and Literature * Cancelled*

June 1, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map
$65

Due to unforeseen circumstances, this seminar has been cancelled All past roads lead to now, but what if we had taken another route? Would we end up in the same place? This seminar explores how thinking counterfactually can help explain why the present is the way it is. Participants will learn how biologists consider the possibility of divergent paths to today’s distinct species as they examine the processes behind evolution.We will also discuss how writers have explored “what if ”…

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Spies and Deception: The History of Espionage in the United States

June 8, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map
$65

Images of eavesdropping technicians in vans and trenchcoat-wearing operatives exchanging information in dimly lit alleyways dominate our public imagination of espionage, but what is the reality behind these fanciful cinematic notions? This Dialogues seminar will pair two experts on spywork to discuss the history of the U.S. intelligence regime in the modern era, starting with the origins of the CIA and including the development of other intelligence agencies and strategies for deceiving enemies.We’ll investigate how well espionage actually works, the…

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New Media, the Newspaper Crisis, and the Future of Democracy

June 15, 2019 @ 9:15 am - 4:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Local newspapers have long been essential contributors to public debates, investigations of government institutions, economic information, community identities, and demo- cratic political life.The rise of new social media and the rapid decline of newspapers, however, is now transforming the ways in which news is gathered, communicated, and linked to civic life.This seminar will examine the current newspaper crisis and explore its implications for the future of democratic public life in the United States.Three experts with wide knowledge of the modern…

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Singapore and Chicago: Modern Global Cities in Social Transition

June 22, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map
$65

Singapore and Chicago became vibrant centers of global commerce in the late 19th century, and they remain major cities in contemporary economic and cultural life. They are also places in which the most notable patterns of modern social life continue to evolve, though in the different contexts of Southeast Asia and the American Midwest. Two  experts in social and economic history (both long- time Chicago residents) will examine how these cities have evolved through changing economic contexts, urban redevelopment, modern…

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Authoritarian Populism and Endangered Democracies

June 29, 2019 @ 9:15 am - 4:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

The end of the Cold War led some analysts to believe that the demise of communism in Eastern Europe would ensure a steady expansion of democracy throughout the world. Democratic values and institutions are currently facing new challenges around the globe, however, and this seminar will examine some of the places in which anti-democratic trends are evoking concerns. Our interdisciplinary faculty will discuss recent events in Turkey, Brazil, Hungary, Poland, Britain, and Germany, providing perspectives to interpret the meaning of…

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July 2019

Pillars of Antiquity: Space and Time in Egypt, Greece, and Rome

July 13, 2019 @ 9:15 am - 4:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

People in the ancient world developed complex ideas about time and place to help them understand their place in the geographic and cosmological order.This seminar will provide new perspectives on how ancient cultures in Egypt, Greece, and Rome described the meaning of the cosmos, the importance of prophecies, and the significance of time in human lives. Join us for a discussion of how the ancient world created social practices and cultural legacies that endured for centuries in the Mediterranean world…

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September 2019

Notre Dame Cathedral and French Culture: The Meaning of a National Monument

September 14, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

The great fire in the famous Notre Dame Cathedral badly damaged a great Parisian monument, but it seemed to affect French national identity almost as profoundly as it damaged the church itself. How does the history of this iconic cathedral embody the complexity of French culture and national memory? This question shapes the themes of this seminar, which will explore the significance of Notre Dame in French architectural history, political culture, literary works, and musical traditions. Drawing on diverse scholarly…

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October 2019

International Trade and Cultural Exchange from the Renaissance to Today

October 5, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

What do we learn when we exchange goods and ideas with other cultures? How does engagement with the wider world help us understand ourselves? This seminar explores connections among commerce, art, and culture in three eras. We’ll travel to early modern Venice to learn about that city-state’s ascendance as a commercial power in Europe and understand how business with the East helped usher in the modern age. Next, we’ll be introduced to American artists of the 19th-century era of imperial…

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The Atomic Bomb and the End of the Second World War *Sold Out*

October 19, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

*This event is sold out. To be added to the waitlist, email human@unc.edu with your First & Last Name, Email address, & phone number.* Political and military leaders in the United States planned a final military campaign that could end the war with Japan in 1945, but a land invasion would carry extremely high human and economic costs.The American decision to drop atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki evolved from careful strategic analysis of these costs, but the new weapons…

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November 2019

Four Great Controversies in Early Christianity: An Encore Presentation *Sold Out. Waitlist Available*

November 1, 2019 @ 4:30 pm - November 2, 2019 @ 12:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

Sold Out: To be added to the waitlist please email human@unc.edu with your name and phone number.* A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Bart D. Ehrman The growth of the Christian church from a tiny sect of Jesus’ close followers to a major world religion was not smooth and seamless. Christians faced controversy on every front—externally with both pagans and Jews and internally with various Christian groups holding diverse theological views struggling for dominance.This seminar will consider four major controversies in…

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The Fall of the Berlin Wall – 30 Years Later *Sold Out*

November 9, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

This event is sold out. For those who have registered in advance, this event will take place at the FedEx Global Education Center on Pittsboro St. In collaboration with the Center for European Studies The collapse of communist governments in Central Europe in 1989 offered an historic transition for people who expected new political freedoms, new wealth, and new personal opportunities. No event symbol- ized this momentous change more dramatically than the destruction of the Berlin Wall in November of…

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The Postwar Boom: American Musicals of the 1950s

November 16, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 4:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Tim Carter “You’ve never had it so good,” proclaimed the U.S. Democratic party in the 1952 presidential election.The fact that the Democrats lost, however, suggests that despite the postwar boom, not everything in the garden was rosy. As in previous decades, Broadway and Hollywood musicals captured the spirit of the times; they also came into increasing competition with each other as new technologies transformed the movie-going experience. Come for another installment of Tim Carter’s series…

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February 2020

How the World Changed in 1940: Nazi Expansion and the Global Crisis of World War II *SOLD OUT*

February 1, 2020 @ 9:30 am - 3:45 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

This event is SOLD OUT. To be added to the waitlist, please email human@unc.edu with your first & last name and preferred phone number.   A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Gerhard L. Weinberg FEBRUARY 1 9:30 am–3:45 pm The European military campaigns of the Second World War began in Poland in September 1939, but the violence in Western Europe developed slowly enough to be called a “phony war.” This quietness on the western front ended abruptly in the spring of…

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The Great Cities of Eastern Europe: Prague and St. Petersburg

February 8, 2020 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

In collaboration with the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies Since emerging from Communist control in 1990, Prague and St. Petersburg have regained much of their historic vitality. Although visitors now travel from all parts of the world to see these cities, they are often unaware of the social, cultural, and political forces that have reshaped each of these historic places over the past three decades. Why do these cities have so much influence on the cultural history…

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Great Journeys in World History and the Travelers Who Described Them

February 15, 2020 @ 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

FEBRUARY 15 | 9:00 am–5:00 pm Human curiosity has always pushed people to set off on long journeys to learn about the wider world, to look for wealth and fame, or to find new knowledge about themselves. This seminar will examine notable travel experiences that changed the lives of travelers, contributed to new literary works, and also influenced others who made their own journeys in later times. We’ll look at famous journeys in pre-modern Europe and the expanding United States…

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The Private is Political: Understanding Privacy at the Margins

February 18, 2020 @ 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

featuring Alice E. Marwick, Assistant Professor of Communication Technology, Society, and Culture In the modern world we cannot avoid technology, but we can try to understand its effects on our society and culture. Join us for this spring’s interdisciplinary series of talks that explore the many ways technology is changing our lives— from the music we play, to the cars we drive, to the people we vote for, and much more. Event description coming soon. All programs are held from…

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Archaeology and Ancient Societies: New Perspectives from Egypt and the Native American South

February 22, 2020 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

In collaboration with the Institute for the Study of the Americas Archaeological knowledge resembles historical knowledge in analyzing past societies that helped to shape later human cultures, but archaeological insights come from sources and analytical methods that often differ from the materials and methods that other humanists employ. This Dialogues seminar will bring together two UNC-Chapel Hill archaeologists whose work focuses on ancient Egyptian cultures and pre-modern Native American cultures. What have archaeologists learned about these complex societies and their…

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Heaven and Hell: Ancient Ideas about the Afterlife

February 28, 2020 @ 4:30 pm - February 29, 2020 @ 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

SOLD OUT: EMAIL HUMAN@UNC.EDU WITH YOUR NAME & PHONE NUMBER TO BE ADDED TO THE WAITLIST A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Bart D. Ehrman According to the most recent Pew Research Poll, 72 percent of all Americans believe in a literal heaven as a place of eternal blessing for departed souls, while 58 percent believe in a literal hell and its eternal torments. Although Christians have believed these ideas for centuries, they are not taught in the Old Testament or…

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September 2021

The German Invasion of the Soviet Union in World War II

September 25, 2021 @ 9:30 am - 3:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Gerhard L. Weinberg In collaboration with the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies World War II was the most destructive conflict in world history, and the war in the Soviet Union was its most deadly theater. Join eminent historian Gerhard Weinberg as he reviews the events preceding and during Operation Barbarossa, the Nazi invasion of the USSR in 1941. We’ll learn about ideas and prejudices of the two dictators, Hitler and Stalin, and…

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October 2021

The Book of Revelation

October 9, 2021 @ 9:30 am - 4:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Bart D. Ehrman The book of Revelation is perhaps the most mysterious, the most misunderstood, the most violent, and the most anomalous book in the Christian Bible. Join our distinguished scholar Dr. Bart Ehrman as he explores what this famous document actually reveals. Does it provide a divinely inspired blueprint for the future, either near or distant, of planet earth, or is there something else at play here? What of the doomsday interpreters throughout the…

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The New Politics of the 21st Century *POSTPONED*

October 16, 2021 @ 9:15 am - 3:45 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

*THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL SPRING 2022. WE WILL CONTACT EVERYONE WHO REGISTERED REGARDING TRANSFER CREDITS & REFUNDS. WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE* Democracy is under threat worldwide as illiberal forces call elections into question, threaten the civil liberties of citizens, and cast doubt on many of the professed political virtues that have defined the post-Cold War world. Join us for this collection of lectures to learn how this transformation is happening, where we can see it, and, perhaps,…

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Alexander and Catherine: “Greats” and Their Empires

October 30, 2021 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

A Dialogues Seminar In collaboration with the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies What makes a leader “great?” Join us for a review of two charismatic and important figures in world history, Alexander of Macedon and Catherine of Russia, both of whom share the superlative. These leaders conquered territory, consolidated power, and left large political and cultural legacies in their wake. This Dialogues seminar will examine their lives in parallel to identify important similarities while placing them in…

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November 2021

Europe Today: The Old World in a New Era

November 13, 2021 @ 9:15 am - 3:45 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

In collaboration with the Center for European Studies In the decades since World War II, states in Europe have created a cohesive government in the EU that transcends old boundaries and links disparate peoples together in one of the world’s largest economies. This seminar will explore contemporary Europe and its model of governance to see what it may have to offer as examples for the rest of the world. It will also examine what European identity means in the face…

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December 2021

Beethoven @ 250

December 4, 2021 @ 9:30 am - 4:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Mark Evan Bonds In collaboration with the UNC Department of Music The year 2020 marked the 250th anniversary of Ludwig van Beethoven’s birth. Perhaps more than any other composer, we hear Beethoven in his music, which continues to both delight and challenge us. But how and why? What is it that makes his music so distinctive? With the assistance of cellist Brent Wissick and pianist Andrew Willis, Mark Evan Bonds explores the ways in which…

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February 2022

The Age of Atlantic Revolutions, 1775-1800

February 5 @ 9:30 am - 4:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Lloyd S. Kramer This seminar will examine the revolutionary upheavals that spread across the Atlantic world in the late eighteenth century, creating independent nations and advocating new conceptions of human rights that continue to influence the modern world. Each session will focus on specific events, ideas, and leaders, with particular attention to the American and French Revolutions. These revolutions challenged traditional political hierarchies and claimed to represent the sovereignty of national populations. We’ll look at…

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The New Politics of the 21st Century

February 18 @ 4:30 pm - February 19 @ 12:45 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

It has become increasingly clear to many in America and throughout the world that the political norms of the 20th century no longer accurately describe conditions on the ground. Severe polarization, public distrust of institutions, racial unrest and reckoning, and an accelerating climate crisis, among many other factors, have changed the way we think about and conduct politics today. How do we make sense of this change? What are the important issues we should confront? Can our democracy meet these…

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Sacred Sites Across Cultures and Time

February 26 @ 9:15 am - 3:45 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

People all over the world and through the ages have imbued physical spaces with spiritual significance. This seminar will take us back in time to explore a variety of sacred sites, their meanings, and how people used or engaged with them. We will learn about medieval pilgrimages, travel to Byzantine-era synagogues, and examine the fascinating monuments of Mesoamerica with our scholars. Join us for this exploration of the idea of the “axis mundi” in its many manifestations and for a…

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March 2022

Institutions, Rights, and Society: A Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Exploration

March 5 @ 9:15 am - 3:45 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

In collaboration and with support from the UNC-Duke Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program First created at Oxford University in the 1920s, the field of Politics, Philosophy, and Economics (PPE) cultivates unique interdisciplinary perspectives on ideas that shape our socioeconomic and political world. In collaboration with UNC-Duke PPE program, we have organized a seminar that features scholarship on contemporary issues from the perspective of three different disciplines. We will learn about education systems and the political activism of children from Alexandra…

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April 2022

Literary Couples

April 2 @ 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

A Dialogues Distinguished Scholar seminar featuring Beverly Taylor Writers are often thought of as lonely souls who sacrifice their personal lives to dedicate themselves to their art, but many find love and companionship—and sometimes with other writers! Join distinguished scholar Beverly Taylor as she explores two marriages between giants of 19th century English literature: the Shelleys (Mary and Percy Bysshe) and the Brownings (Elizabeth Barrett and Robert). Participants will learn about their personal histories, their relationships, and how their marriages…

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New Perspectives on French Art

April 23 @ 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

A Dialogues seminar Join us for a morning immersed in the world of French art. Scholars Kathryn Desplanque and Alexis Clark will discuss French art in society and offer new perspectives on how we study and engage with art beyond just appreciating its aesthetic qualities. From the creation of an “art world” in Paris in the 18th and 19th centuries, to the importation of Monet in America in the postwar era, we will learn about French art embedded in new…

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The Lesser-Known Theaters of World War II: Scandinavia, Burma, and New Guinea

April 30 @ 9:30 am - 3:00 pm
Chapel Hill Campus, Please Contact Carolina Public Humanities for exact location + Google Map

A Distinguished Scholar Seminar featuring Gerhard L. Weinberg   TOPICS Scandinavia Burma New Guinea ........ Gerhard L. Weinberg is the William Rand Kenan Jr. Professor of History Emeritus. He is an internationally known expert on all aspects of World War II and author of numerous books, including the comprehensive, award-winning masterwork A World at Arms: A Global History of World War II. TIME AND TUITION 9:30 am-3:00 pm, Saturday, April 30. The tuition is $125 to attend in person or…

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